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Artists, Craftspeople, Musicians, Festivals, & Others that exhibit, perform or work in the music, art, craft, festival biz and special events industry, will find these past Newsletters of interest.

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Years 2012-2014. To access a back issue, click the Newsletter title. Use the search box above to find a topic in all years.


March 2015 Newsletters - Artists & Crafters | Musicians | Food Vendors | Promoters | MarketPlace | Affiliates



Artists and Crafters News:

How to Get Rejected by the Press

by Carolyn Edlund

Are you making this huge mistake when reaching out to the press? Here's how to take the right approach for better results.

art

Collage of artwork by Kelly Dombrowski. Alcohol ink on Yupo paper.

As an art blogger who publishes frequent business articles and features, I've been a "press member" for years - and I've been contacted thousands of times by artists and others who are seeking publicity for their artwork, project or event.

That means pitches and inquiries come into my inbox every day. Lots of them. And honestly, although most of the people who get in touch are probably very nice people, they are making a fatal mistake when it comes to getting press attention. They are using a "scattershot" approach and not taking the necessary time to customize their emails.

Here's one example: the email (usually through my contact form) that starts with "Hi there" or no greeting at all. It's from someone I don't know who wants me to read their message, click on all their links, and take some kind of action - for example, creating an article about them or inviting them to write a guest post.

Now I know full well that "Hi there" means they don't know my name (which is easily found on my site) and they probably know nothing about the blog. The sender is using "copy and paste" to reach out to everyone on a list that they obtained. These are form letters sent out to serve the interests of an artist seeking some free publicity.

Essentially the sender wants to minimize the time they take to seek press coverage, and are using their form letter to ask the press member to read their content, view their portfolio, and decide to undertake a project to their benefit. They want to send a quick, generic and impersonal "copy and paste" message, but want they want in return is a time-consuming and customized result. That rarely works, and ends up as a major frustration to both the artist and the press member being solicited.

Read more!




Musicians News:

What Every Musician Needs To Know About The Sound Guy

by Ari Herstand

positive attitude As much time as you spend in your rehearsal space perfecting your sound, it won't mean anything if it's botched coming out of the PA. All the money you spent on new pedals, amps, guitars and strings doesn't matter if the mix is off in the club.

The sound guy (or gal) is the most important component of your show that most bands don't really think about. He (going with he for this piece out of ease - and most are men) can break your set (few sound guys can actually MAKE your set if you suck).

So, you have to know how to approach sound guys right and get them on your team for the short amount of time that you have with them.

Get His Name

The first thing you should do is introduce yourself to the sound guy when you arrive. Shake his hand, look him in the eye and exchange names. Remember his name - you're most likely going to need to use it many many times that night and possibly a couple times through the mic during your set. If you begin treating him with respect from the get go he will most likely return this sentiment.

Respect His Ears

All sound guys take pride in their mixing. Regardless of the style of music they like listening to in their car, they believe they can mix any genre on the spot. However, most sound guys will appreciate hearing what you, the musician, likes for a general house mix of your band's sound. Don't be afraid to tell him a vibe or general notes ("this should feel like a warm back massage" or "we like the vocals and acoustic very high in the mix" or "we like keeping all vocal mics at about the same level for blended harmonies" or "add lots of reverb on the lead vocals, but keep the fiddle dry"). He'll appreciate knowing what you like and will cater to that. He is most likely a musician himself, so treat him as one - with respect. He knows music terms - don't be afraid to use them.

Don't Start Playing Until He's Ready

Set up all of your gear but don't start wailing on the guitar or the drums until all the mics are in place and he's back by the board. Pounding away on the kit while he's trying to set his mics will surely piss him off and ruin his ears. Get there early enough for sound check so you have plenty of time to feel the room out (and tune your drums).

Read more here!



Promoters News:

Tips on Creating & Managing a Street Team

by Kevin Morrison

Promoting events When promoting a concert or special event, the effectiveness of one's street team can be the difference in losing money, breaking even, or making a profit. Wikipedia defines a street team as "a term used in marketing to describe a group of people who 'hit the streets' promoting an event or a product." Their duties include: distributing promotional items and flyers, putting up posters and stickers, and a lot of word-of-mouth promotion throughout community. These foot soldiers, who are mainly volunteers, can be the single most important element to a successful promotion when adequately deployed. Here are a few tips to help you develop and manage your own street team.

The first step is to know and understand the people you are considering to join your squad. This can be achieved by creating a short form for potential members to fill out. Or, you can just setup an initial meeting with each one but be prepared to jot down some notes. The purpose of this is to find out their strengths and weaknesses as it pertains to the duties that will be assigned to them. Find out their level of commitment, likes, dislikes, general availability, and administrative/marketing/computer skills and inadequacies. Look for people with common sense, good judgment, the ability to think on their feet, and some level of expertise or a strong desire to learn. Use this information to place them in a position on the team where their top skills can be utilized. It can also help you determine what new responsibilities you can add to their duties at a later date and who to choose as group leaders.

Read more here!





Food Vendor News:

The Cost of Being a Vendor at a Food Festival

by Helen Qin for thebillfold.com

My boyfriend and I made a big move at the beginning of this year from Los Angeles to Cleveland for a job promotion I received at work. He'd gotten into making ice cream while we were in California-we had even tossed around the idea of starting our own business, but the task was daunting and the costs seemed prohibitive.

Due to the move, we are currently living rent-free with his mom while he looks for employment. Given my salary bump and the lower cost of living, it seemed like a good time to take a risk, so we started Mason's Creamery, our ice cream business. We decided to target food festivals and farmer's markets because:
  1. The initial costs are lower than it would be to rent a storefront or go the food truck route.
  2. It's about to be summer! People love food festivals and farmer's markets in the summer, right?
  3. That's pretty much it.
In March, we applied, and somehow finagled our way into an upcoming festival in Cleveland that will happen in May. We were also recently accepted to the downtown Cleveland Farmer's Market, and will continue to apply to others around the area. This way, we hope to get our name out and eventually segue into something less booth-like. For anyone curious about the costs of starting a very small business, or the costs of a festival (because you love festivals in the summer), here's the rundown:

Pre-Festival:

- $120, one-time: Business incorporation for the state of Ohio, with which we can now procure our EIN (free of charge!).

- $299/year: Liability insurance-we used Food Insurance Liability Program (FLIP). FLIP covers food vendors at festivals and farmer's market at a much lower cost than actual food insurers. The $299 we paid is the lowest rate, which is based on sales numbers. Our sales are $0.

- $25, one-time: Transient vendor's license for the state of Ohio, which will need to be renewed yearly but paid only once.

- $15/every three years: Online food safety course called ServSafe, a national food safety certification.

- $160, one-time: Food vendor license and placard for the city of Cleveland.

Read more here!





MarketPlace News:

How to Get Rejected by the Press

by Carolyn Edlund

Are you making this huge mistake when reaching out to the press? Here's how to take the right approach for better results.

art

Collage of artwork by Kelly Dombrowski. Alcohol ink on Yupo paper.

As an art blogger who publishes frequent business articles and features, I've been a "press member" for years - and I've been contacted thousands of times by artists and others who are seeking publicity for their artwork, project or event.

That means pitches and inquiries come into my inbox every day. Lots of them. And honestly, although most of the people who get in touch are probably very nice people, they are making a fatal mistake when it comes to getting press attention. They are using a "scattershot" approach and not taking the necessary time to customize their emails.

Here's one example: the email (usually through my contact form) that starts with "Hi there" or no greeting at all. It's from someone I don't know who wants me to read their message, click on all their links, and take some kind of action - for example, creating an article about them or inviting them to write a guest post.

Now I know full well that "Hi there" means they don't know my name (which is easily found on my site) and they probably know nothing about the blog. The sender is using "copy and paste" to reach out to everyone on a list that they obtained. These are form letters sent out to serve the interests of an artist seeking some free publicity.

Essentially the sender wants to minimize the time they take to seek press coverage, and are using their form letter to ask the press member to read their content, view their portfolio, and decide to undertake a project to their benefit. They want to send a quick, generic and impersonal "copy and paste" message, but want they want in return is a time-consuming and customized result. That rarely works, and ends up as a major frustration to both the artist and the press member being solicited.

Read more!







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