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           Craft Shows, Music Festivals, Fine Art Fairs
 Festival Network Online Newsletter
 Art/Craft Edition  - February 2006
        
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This is an opt-in newsletter.  If you got this by mistake,
please follow the link at the bottom.


A note from the editor
...

Hey Artists and Craftspeople,

Enjoy this month's newsletter from our good friend Steve of The Thriving Artist.  Also, catch his recent interview with FNO owner Kurt Irmiter:
http://www.thethrivingartist.com/irmiter/

Be sure to rate the shows you have been to!  Log in, search for the shows you know, and click on the "rate it" link.

Until next month,
Julie
julie@festivalnet.com

Choosing Subject Matter that Sells

How do you choose the subject matter that will sell best?

This is a great question and I'll tell you why...Most artists screw this up and sell the wrong art to the wrong buyer. Think about this for a moment...You create a great piece of work and try to sell it at an art show, gallery or even on the internet. You believe that your work is tailored to any type of buyer, but it isn't.

Art has to communicate with the viewer and create an effect. If the piece doesn't accomplish this it won't sell. For instance, creating a piece of modern contemporary art won't sell easily in the southwest United States if buyers are looking for pieces with a Southwest design.

I would recommend visiting various art shows and galleries in the area where you want to sell and find out what is selling best. This is so easy to do most artists will bypass this and just go right on producing huge amounts of work and then get discouraged when their pieces don't sell.

The second thing I would recommend doing is surveying people in your area that are buying art. You can find these people at galleries, stores, art shows, museums, etc. Ask them in what style are they decorating their homes or businesses. You can also do some research online and find out the "lifestyle trends" in your demographic area. For example, if you live in the wine country, why not create artwork that encompasses this passion? People will buy art that is focused around what they are already interested in. Why not just work with the flow then against it?

I would recommend doing a little homework before launching into a particular genre of artwork. Now, this is not to say that you have to be directed by the marketplace. In other words, you do not have to lose your creativity and just make art for the masses. What I am saying is to take your art to the audience that is interested in that type of art. This takes a little research, but this research will pay off handsomely in the end.


Article provided by:
Steve Popkin, owner of the website http://www.thethrivingartist.com
Learn the secrets most artists and craftsmen will never know about selling artwork in his complimentary e-course


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Newsletter editor: Julie M. Cochrane
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Articles should be in the 700 to 900 word range and will include a
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